Translations

“Many Warring States period tombs discovered at family-based common cemetery, Hubei Province,” Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, May 31, 2016.

Pottery from tomb. Photo from CASS Institute of Archaeology.

In 2014-2015, the Hubei Jingzhou Museum conducted rescue excavations of the Liujiatai and Xiajiatai cemetery in Jingzhou District, Hubei province. Altogether 350 Warring States period (475-221 BC) tombs were excavated and 3,058 artifacts (sets) were recovered, which included 1,797 pottery items, 398 bronze pieces, 420 bamboo writing slips, 375 lacquered (or painted) wooden objects, 30 jade and stone wares, 3 silk fabrics, 3 leather items (sets), and 32 organics objects (i.e., 17 deer antlers and 15 pickled fish).

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“Liao Dynasty Noble Consort tombs discovered in Inner Mongolia,” Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, May 17, 2016.

Lotus shaped copper incense burner with handle unearthed from tomb M1. Photo from CASS Institute of Archaeology.

From June to December 2015, the Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology, Inner Mongolia, and other units carried out rescue excavations on a Liao Dynasty cemetery in Xilingol, Duolun County, Xiaowangligou. Those rescue excavations salvaged two Liao Dynasty tombs (M1 and M2).

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“Newly discovered Zhou Dynasty ruins in Shaanxi Province,” Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, May 17, 2016.

An archaeological team consisting of members from the Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Science’s Institute of Archaeology, and Peking University started a new round of excavations at the Zhouyuan site in September 2014. This installment of archaeological work had two directions, based on an understanding of the settlement ruins as a capital; first, a focus centered on the northern Hejia area and the Fengchu building complex, to expose as much of the above-mentioned area as possible; and second, the settlement’s water network system and city walls, to understand the layout and function of those areas. Based on the above work, locations of city walls, buildings, handicraft workshops, cemeteries, and such were established; important traces of organic links among these things were also established; and new archaeological excavation methods were explored at the site.

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“A Han to Wei-Jin Dynasties cemetery discovered in Wuliping, Hunan Province,” Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, March 3, 2016.

The Wuliping group of graves was located in Yongzhou, Lanshan County, Hunan Province. The ancient graves were concentrated in an area of approximately 6 square kilometers near the Shunshui River’s northwestern area and the cemetery was comparatively large in scope. Its southern border is less than 2 kilometers from the ancient Han dynasty city of Nanping.

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